The Pandigital E-Reader in a case with a light.

The Pandigital E-Reader in a case with a light.

Last year on Mother’s Day the kids got me an e-reader. Unfortunately, it took me until a few weeks ago to get through the pile of print books I’d already purchased so I could try it out. Funny, how my reading list can get ahead of me!

In the meantime, I’d started teaching a course in Canadian Literature to my students in the Library and Information Technology diploma program at the online school where I work–Credenda. Since my virtual students are spread from one end of the province to the other, some of them from fly-in only Northern Saskatchewan communities, I decided to give lots of options on the novel they’d need to read for analysis.

Here’s the list:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governor_General%27s_Award_for_English-language_fiction

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Stephen_Leacock_Award_winners

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Leacock_Memorial_Medal_for_Humour

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotiabank_Giller_Prize

http://www.crimewriterscanada.com/awards/arthur-ellis-awards/past-winners – Must use only the categories of Best Novel or Best First Novel (not the children’s awards)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_Award – Must use only the category of best long form.

 

They’d have six weeks to read the book and then we’d have a literary “discussion” by telephone, talking about what made the book distinctive enough to add to the Canadian literary canon. Of course, that meant I had to read each of the books as well.

It was the perfect time to try out my Pandigital e-reader! So, off I went to the Kobo Store, (which by the way has tons of Canadian literary novels, which is logical since they’re a Canadian company), to get whatever titles were in e-book form.

At this point, I also have to admit that last year I got new progressive lenses bifocals, and reading had lost a lot of its allure because I just couldn’t get comfortable in my recliner and still read the darn books. While it’s true that progressive lenses have a spot that’s just right for every distance you want to see, it’s only one tiny elusive spot!

E-readers, of course, have the advantage of being able to change the size of font to a pretty large size, although a badly produced ebook font won’t adjust and stays at about size 8 or smaller on the screen of my Pandigital. Another advantage to the e-reader is that there’s also no gutter to swallow up the words at the inside edge or make them appear distorted when the pages bend. Hoping for the best, I purchased my first e-book and added it to my e-book library. I also bought an e-reader cover with a light in it, so I could get the light exactly where I needed it–something that had also failed me with reading lamps and print books.

Soon I had my recliner back, my feet up in front of me, the little light illuminating my pages and the story started sailing by. Reading was not only possible again, it was as enjoyable as I remembered. Thank goodness for e-readers for aging eyes!